Skip to content Skip to navigation

Lemann Dialogue 2018

Date: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018 (All day) to Friday, November 16, 2018 (All day)
Location: 
CERAS Learning Hall - Stanford University

Lemann Dialogue 2018

Videos

Panel I – Social Innovations and Politics

Panel II – Inequality – US & Brazil

Panel III – Teacher Learning

Panel IV – Technology & Social Innovation

Panel V – Columbia University - Innovations in the Public Sector

Panel VI – Harvard University - Corruption and Justice

Panel VII - University of Illinois: What is the Prognosis for the Brazilian Economy?

Panel VIII - Post Election Analysis

Speakers

Panel I – Social Innovations and Politics

David Plank, Stanford University David Plank is a Research Professor at the Stanford University School of Education. He has also served as a consultant to national and international organizations including the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the United States Agency for International Development, the Ford Foundation, and also to governments in Africa and Latin America. Plank is the author and editor of six books, including the AERA Handbook on Educational Policy Research. He has published several studies on Brazilian Education including the book The Means of Our Salvation: Public Education in Brazil, 1930-1995, which was published in Brazil as Política Educacional no Brasil: Caminhos para a Salvação Pública.

Maurício Holanda, Chamber of Deputies Consultant Maurício Holanda Consultor legislativo da Câmara dos Deputados para a área de “Educação, Cultura e Esporte”. Mestrado e doutorado em educação [Universidade Federal do Ceará — UFC]. Especialização em Politicas Públicas e Gestão Governamental [Escola Nacional de Administração Pública]. Foi Secretario Municipal de Educação de Sobral e Secretrario de Educação do Ceará

Kathryn Moeller, Stanford University (Visiting Scholar) Kathryn Moeller is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Lemann Center for Educational Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Brazil at Stanford University. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her interdisciplinary, ethnographic scholarship examines corporate power and its effects on people's lives, educations, and futures. She is the author of The Gender Effect: Capitalism, Feminism, and the Corporate Politics of Development (University of California Press, 2018), winner of the 2018 National Women's Studies Association Sara A. Whaley Book Prize. She has articles in Feminist Studies, British Journal of Sociology of Education,and International Journal of Education Development. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation, Fulbright, Fulbright-Hays, and the Wenner Gren Foundation. She received her Ph.D. from the Social and Cultural Studies Program in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley with a Designated Emphasis in Gender, Women, and Sexuality from the Department of Gender & Women’s Studies.

Yasodara Cordova, Harvard University Yaso is an activist, researcher, developer and designer. She is currently affiliate at Berkman Klein Center at Harvard and a fellow at Digital Harvard Kennedy School, where she works on technologies to bootstrap democracy, using open data, privacy, online identity, and blockchain. She is also a fellow at the Center for technology and Society at Fundacao Getúlio Vargas (CTS-FGV), researching data extraction for social impact and public policies, besides smart cities and discrimination.

Denis Mizne, Lemann Foundation Advogado formado pela USP, foi visiting scholar na Universidade Columbia e Yale World Fellow na Universidade Yale. Fundou e preside o conselho do Instituto Sou da Paz. É membro do conselho da Fundação Roberto Marinho e do GIFE – grupo de Institutos, Fundações e Empresas.

Panel II – Inequality – US & Brazil

David Grusky, Stanford University David Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Professor of Sociology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as the future of extreme inequality in the United States, recent trends in social mobility, the sources of gender inequality, the role of social classes and social closure in reducing opportunity, and new approaches to reducing poverty and increasing mobility.

Zephyr Frank, Stanford University Zephyr Frank (PhD Illinois, 1999) teaches Latin American history at Stanford, where he also directs the Program on Urban Studies. His research focuses on the intersection of social history, cultural studies, and the application of quantitative and digital humanities methods. Recent publications include, Reading Rio de Janeiro: Literature and Society in Nineteenth-Century Brazil (Stanford, 2016) and an essay, "Urban property in nineteenth-century Rio de Janeiro: rent, neighborhoods, and networks" in the Routledge Companion to Spatial History (2018).

Francisco Ferreira, World Bank Francisco H. G. Ferreira is a Senior Adviser in the World Bank’s Development Research Group, where he oversees the Bank’s research programs on poverty and inequality. He was formerly the Bank’s Chief Economist for the Africa Region, and has also served as Deputy Chief Economist for Latin America and the Caribbean, and as co-Director of the World Development Report 2006, on Equity and Development. Francisco is also a non-resident Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Bonn). He has published widely in the fields of poverty and inequality in developing countries. He is a co-editor of the World Bank Economic Review and has served as Editor in Chief of the Journal of Economic Inequality and of Economía..

Leticia Marteleto, The University of Texas at Austin Letícia J. Marteleto is associate professor of sociology and research associate at the Population Research Center at the University of Texas-Austin. Her research on social demography, stratification, education and health inequalities has been published in Demography, Population and Development Review, Social Forces, and Sociology of Education among others. In her newest research, funded by NICHD, she focuses on birth, fertility and reproductive behaviors and outcomes related to the Zika epidemic in Brazil.

Luncheon Talk

Noam Wasserman, University of Southern California Noam Wasserman is bestselling author of The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup (2012) and the new Life Is a Startup: What Founders Can Teach Us about Making Choices and Managing Change. He was a professor at Harvard Business School for 13 years and is now founding director of the Founder Central initiative at the University of Southern California and the Lemann Chair in Entrepreneurship. Noam created HBS’s most popular entrepreneurship elective, “Founder’s Dilemmas,” for which he won HBS’s Faculty Teaching award and USC’s Golden Apple teaching award. He also won the Academy of Management’s Impact on Practice award and its Innovation in Entrepreneurship Pedagogy award.

Panel III – Teacher Learning

Martin Carnoy, Stanford University Martin Carnoy is Vida Jacks Professor at the Stanford University School of Education. He has also worked as consultant to the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, UNESCO, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), UNICEF, and the International Labor Organization. Carnoy is a fellow of the National and International Academy of Education and the former president of the Comparative and International Education Society. Much of his work is comparative and international, and investigates the impact of global economic and social change on the way educational systems are organized. He has authored more than thirty books, including the acclaimed “Cuba's Academic Advantage.” Carnoy and colleagues from South Africa and Botswana have recently published an innovative study on primary schooling in southern Africa, The Low Achievement Trap. He is currently completing a book on higher educational change in the large developing countries—Brazil, Russia, India, and China—known as the BRICs.

Paula Louzano, Universidad Diego Portales Paula Louzano is the Dean of Diego Portales School of Education in Santiago, Chile. She holds a MA in International Comparative Education from Stanford University and a doctoral degree in Administration, Planning and Social Policy from Harvard University. She was a visiting fellow at the Stanford Lemann Center when she directed PED Brasil. Her research interests include teacher education, equality of educational opportunities, and design, implementation and evaluation of educational policies in Brazil and Latin America. She has lately conducted research on teacher professional development, curricular policies and teacher practices in Brazil. Her prior experience includes working at UNESCO Bureau of Education for Latin America and the Caribbean in Santiago, Chile and serving as a consultant for several non-governmental organizations and governments in Brazil. She has also worked as a consultant for international organizations such as UNESCO, IDB and the World Bank.

Felipe Tsuruta, Cleyton Martins, Nattasha Kyaw, Universidade Veiga de Almeida Felipe Tsuruta holds a Master's degree in Chemistry, and else a graduation in Chemistry. He works as a Professor at Veiga de Almeida University, in graduate and postgraduate courses. Also is the coordinator and Professor at PED-Brasil and General Coordinator of postgraduates courses at UVA. Cleyton Martins holds a Master's and PhD in Chemistry, and else a degree in Chemistry. He worked for 9 years as a Science Teacher for Elementary School. At Veiga de Almeida University, he teaches in graduate and postgraduate courses, and is the PED-Brasil Mentor´s. Nattascha Kyaw holds a Master of Science degree and graduation in Biological Sciences. She works as a teacher of the Municipal Elementary Schools of the City of Rio de Janeiro, and she is a participant teacher of PED-Brasil.

Rachel Lotan, Stanford University Dr. Rachel Lotan is Professor (Teaching) Emerita of Education. She served as Director of the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) from 1999-2014 and continues to serve as Director of the Program for Complex Instruction at Stanford. Her teaching and research focus on aspects of teaching and learning in academically and linguistically diverse classrooms as well as topics in teacher education. At Stanford, she earned two A.M. degrees (Education, 1981, Sociology, 1983) and a Ph.D. in Education (1985). For ten years before starting graduate work, Dr. Lotan taught English and French in junior high and high schools.

Helivane de Azevedo Evangelista, Instituto Anima Helivane de Azevedo Evangelista holds a doctorate degree in Applied Linguistics and is the Director of Teacher Education Programs at Instituto Ᾰnima. She is also the Director of PED at Universidade São Judas, UniBH, and Unisociesc.

Panel IV – Technology & Social Innovation

Paulo Blikstein, Columbia University Paulo Blikstein is an Associate Professor of Communication, Media and Learning Technologies, Columbia University. Inspired by the seminal work of Paulo Freire and Seymour Papert, Blikstein works on technological tools to improve the learning of science, engineering, and mathematics. He develops and reserches new tools for computer programming, educational robotics, and digital fabrication which enable children to learn by making, building, and doing, within powerful constructionist learning environments. Blikstein is the co-inventor of the first open-source educational robotics platform, the GoGo Board, used in more than 10 countries and hundreds of schools. He also spearheads the FabLab@School project, building advanced fabrication labs in middle and high-schools in four continents. Blikstein has received notable awards including two Google Faculty Awards, and the National Science Foundation Early Career Award, the highest honor conferred by the U.S. government on exceptional scientists and engineers beginning their careers. Blikstein is one of the founders and executive director of the Center for Educational Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Brazil at Stanford.

Eric Bettinger, Stanford University Eric Bettinger is a Professor at the Stanford School of Education. Bettinger’s current research focuses on factors that improve students' access to and success in college. Some of these factors include the role of teacher characteristics and class sizes in college, the role of need-based financial aid, and the complexity of the college application process. Bettinger has also conducted significant experiments on the effects of financial incentives for students and on the effects of voucher programs on both academic and non-academic outcomes of participating students. He is the author of more than twenty publications in prestigious journals. Bettinger has written, for example, on educational experiment, college remediation, and voucher system. He is fluent in Portuguese and lived in Brazil from 1991 and 1993.

Roseli Lopes, Universidade de São Paulo Roseli de Deus Lopes (Universidade de São Paulo, Brasil) is Associate Professor at Escola Politécnica (School of Engineering), Universidade de São Paulo (USP). She is the vice-chair of CITI-USP (Centro Interdisciplinar em Tecnologias Interativas) and researcher at LSI-USP (Laboratório de Sistemas Integráveis), where she coordinates research projects in interactive electronic media, with emphasis on applications in education, inclusion and health. She served on the technical/pedagogical working group for the One Computer per Student (UCA), sponsored by the Brazilian Ministry of Education. She coordinates projects aimed at identifying and developing talents in STEM, such as FEBRACE, the largest national pre-college science and engineering fair in Brazil, and InovaLab@POLI, an initiative to provide resources and educational expertise to broaden project-based learning and rapid prototyping for engineering undergraduate students. Currently, she serves as a Director at SBPC, the Brazilian Society for the Progress of Science and Technology.

Sarah Holloway, Columbia University Sarah Holloway is a member of the faculty at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) where she teaches social entrepreneurship and nonprofit management, runs the Management program and oversees a campus-wide entrepreneurship initiative focused on global Education Technology for the Center for Development Economics & Policy. Sarah is a serial social entrepreneur and the co-founder of six ventures in K-12 education including MOUSE.org and Computer Science for All (CSforAll).

Panel V – Columbia University - Innovations in the Public Sector

Rodrigo Soares, Columbia University Rodrigo Soares is Lemann Professor of Brazilian Public Policy and International and Public Affairs. Professor Soares’ research centers on development economics, ranging from labor, human capital, and demographic economics, to crime. His work has appeared in various scientific journals, including American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Public Economics, and Journal of Development Economics, among various others. Before joining Columbia, Soares taught at the Sao Paulo School of Economics-FGV, PUC-Rio, the University of Maryland, and the Harvard School of Public Health. In 2006, he was awarded the Kenneth J. Arrow Award from the International Health Economics Association for the best paper published in the field of Health Economics.

Marcia Castro, Harvard University Marcia Castro is Professor of Demography in the Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Faculty member of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies; and Associate Faculty of the Harvard University Center for the Environment. She is a member of the Executive Board of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, and a member of the steering committee of the Brazil Studies Program. Dr. Castro was selected as a 2017-18 AAAS Leshner Fellow, and was the 2018 recipient of the Roger L. Nichols Award for Excellence in Teaching at the Harvard Chan School. The core of her research focuses on infectious diseases, environmental change and health, environmental management for vector control, spatial patterns of disease transmission, infant/child mortality, and child development. She has more than 20 years of experience with malaria in the Brazilian Amazon, with a strong record in the conduct of household surveys; has been conducting dengue research in Brazil for the past 6 years; and has been engaged in Zika virus research studies since Dec/2015. Dr. Castro earned her Ph.D. in Demography from Princeton University.

Douglas Ready, Columbia University Douglas D. Ready is an Associate Professor of Education and Public Policy, and the Director of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE-TC), at Teachers College, Columbia University. He has also held participating faculty roles with Columbia’s Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences Program and its federally funded Population Research Center. His research examines the links between education policy, social policy, and student outcomes, with a particular focus on educational inequalities related to student socio-demographic background. He has served as principal investigator for multiple large-scale domestic and international studies, including those focused on instructional and curricular reform, teacher training and compensation, educational technology, and school segregation and stratification. CPRE-TC is currently engaged in a five-year implementation study of Brazil’s Base Nacional Comum Curricular (BNCC), funded by Fundação Lemann and Itaú Social.

Helena Nader, SBPC/UNIFESP Helena B. Nader holds a bachelor of science degree in Biomedical Sciences from the Federal University of São Paulo (Unifesp), a bachelor of education degree in Biology from the University of São Paulo (1971), a PhD in Molecular Biology from Unifesp (1974), postdoctoral at the University of Southern California (1977) with a grant from Fogarty (NIH). She is full professor at Unifesp (1989), productivity fellow from CNPq (level 1A), full member of the São Paulo Academy of Sciences, the Brazilian Academy of Sciences and the World Academy of Science (TWAS) for the Advancement of Science in Developing Countries. She was President of the Brazilian Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2010-2011) and Vice President (2007-2011) and President (2011-2017) of the Brazilian Society for the Advancement of Science. She is currently a member of the Capes Superior Council.

Panel VI – Harvard University - Corruption and Justice

Fran Hagopian, Harvard University Frances Hagopian is the Jorge Paulo Lemann Senior Lecturer for Brazil Studies in the Department of Government and Faculty Co-Chair of the Brazil Studies Program at Harvard University. She is author of Reorganizing Representation in Latin America (forthcoming), editor of Religious Pluralism, Democracy, and the Catholic Church in Latin America (2009), co-editor (with Scott Mainwaring) of The Third Wave of Democratization in Latin America (2005), and author of Traditional Politics and Regime Change in Brazil (1996) and numerous journal articles and book chapters.

Larry Diamond, Stanford University Larry Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. For more than six years, he directed FSI’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, where he now leads its Program on Arab Reform and Democracy and its Global Digital Policy Incubator. He is the founding co-editor of the Journal of Democracy and also serves as Senior Consultant at the International Forum for Democratic Studies of the National Endowment for Democracy. His research focuses on democratic trends and conditions around in the world, and on policies and reforms to defend and advance democracy.

Diego Werneck Arguelhes, FGV Rio De Janeiro Since 2011, Diego Werneck Arguelhes has been Professor of Law at the Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (FGV Direito Rio), where he had previously been assistant professor (2006-2011). His research focuses on constitutional law, judicial politics, the comparative design of judicial institutions, and the relationship between constitutional change and judicial review. Mr. Arguelhes is a member of the Seminario en Latinoamérica de Teoría Constitucional y Política (SELA) and a regular contributor to the Brazilian press on issues of constitutional law and Supreme Court decision-making, having been one of the founding editors (2015-2016) of the blog Supra: o Supremo Interpretado.

Matthew Winters, University of Illinois Matthew S. Winters is Associate Professor and Associate Head for Graduate Studies in the Department of Political Science at the University of Illinois. His research interests include the allocation and effectiveness of foreign aid, the political-economy of governance, and voter attitudes toward corruption. He has conducted research in Bangladesh, Brazil, Indonesia, Malawi, Mali, and Uganda. Winters has published articles in Journal of Politics, Comparative Politics, International Studies Quarterly, World Development, World Politics, and Political Research Quarterly, among other outlets, and has worked as a consultant for USAID, AusAID, and the World Bank’s Independent Evaluations Group. Winters received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University and was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University.

Luncheon Talk

Francis Fukuyama, Stanford University Francis Fukuyama is the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) and the Mosbacher Director of FSI's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL). He is also a professor by courtesy in the Department of Political Science. He was previously at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University, where he was the Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy and director of SAIS' International Development program. Dr. Fukuyama has written widely on issues relating to questions concerning democratization and international political economy. His book, The End of History and the Last Man, was published by Free Press in 1992 and has appeared in over twenty foreign editions.

Panel VII - University of Illinois: What is the Prognosis for the Brazilian Economy?

Mary Arends-Kuenning, University of Illinois Mary Arends-Kuenning is Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She received a B.S.F.S. from Georgetown University, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining the University of Illinois, she was a Berelson Post Doctoral Fellow at the Population Council in New York City. Dr. Arends-Kuenning's research examines economic and demographic issues in developing countries. She has published articles in a variety of journals and books including Demography, World Development, Population and Development Review, Studies in Family Planning and Economics of Education Review.

Albert Fishlow, Columbia University Albert Fishlow is Professor Emeritus both at the University of California, Berkeley and Columbia University. His published research has addressed Brazilian and Latin American development strategy. His recent books include O Novo Brasil (Editora SaintPaul, 2011), Starting Over: Brazil Since 1985 (Brookings, 2011), and co-author, with José Eustáquio Viera Filho as principal author, of Agricultura e Indústria no Brasil (IPEA, 2017).

Marco Bonomo, INSPER - University of Illinois Marco Bonomo is professor of economics at Insper, where he has served as Associate Dean of Research and Research Degree Programs and as director of the Center for Finance Center (CeFi). He is currently visiting the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as Lemann Distinguished Visiting Professor. He is currently a CNPq (Brazilian Research Council) Research Fellow, and a member of the Latin American Standing Committee of the Econometric Society, of the board of directors of the Brazilian Econometric Society, of the Brazilian Economic Cycle Dating Committee (CODACE, IBRE-FGV), and of the CVM (Brazilian Securities Exchange Commission) Behavioral Studies Nucleus. His main research interests are in macroeconomics, finance and the Brazilian economy. Bonomo holds a PhD degree in economics from Princeton, and MA and BA in economics from PUC-Rio.

Panel VIII - Post Election Analysis

Sabine Righetti, FGV-SP and columnist at Folha de S.Paulo (Moderator) Righetti graduated in Journalism from UNESP. She has a master’s and a doctorate in Scientific and Technological Policies from Unicamp where she is currently associated researcher at Labjor and LEES (Laboratório de Estudos de Educação Superior). She worked as science and education reporter for more than ten years writing for places such as "Folha de S.Paulo" --the largest newspaper in Brazil. Now she writes on science and education for Abecedário, a Grupo Folha blog, and, as a consultant, she collects and analyses the higher education data to produce the Folha’s University Ranking -RUF. This work earned her the Folha Journalism award in 2012 and 2015, and the Estácio Journalism award in 2013. She also was a nominee at the top3 most influents Brazilian journalists in the education area in 2015 and 2016.

Scott Manwaring, Harvard University Scott Mainwaring is the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor for Brazil Studies at the Harvard Kennedy School. His research interests include political parties and party systems, democratic and authoritarian regimes, democratization, and political institutions in Latin American. His book, Democracies and Dictatorships in Latin America: Emergence, Survival, and Fall (with Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, Cambridge University Press, 2013), won best book awards from the Comparative Democratization section of the American Political Science Association and the Political Institutions section of the Latin American Studies Association. His edited book, Party Systems in Latin America: Institutionalization, Decay, and Collapse was published in 2018 by Cambridge University Press). Mainwaring was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2010.

Manuel Castells, University of Southern California Manuel Castells is University Professor and the Wallis Annenberg Chair in Communication Technology and Society at the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles. He is Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, and holds joint appointments in the Department of Sociology, in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development, and in the School of International Relations.

Luciano Huck, TV Host and Entrepreneur Luciano Huck, 47, is a TV host and one of the most important influencers in Brazil. For the past eighteen years, he has hosted “Caldeirão do Huck”, aired every Saturday by Brazilian network Rede Globo with an audience of about 18 million people per program. Luciano believes in a high impact television with messages of protagonism, empowerment and world change. This is the essence of his TV program. In addition to his career in the entertainment industry, Luciano is an active member of Renova and Agora, civic movements that encourage ordinary citizens to participate in political renewal, contributing to the development of proposals to give a new direction to the country. Besides that, In 2010 Luciano founded Joá, an investment fund focused on technology and wellness businesses. In 2004, he founded Instituto Criar de TV, Cinema e Novas Mídias that has the mission of promoting the professional, social and personal development of young people through the audiovisual sector. Since its inception, the Institute has trained over 2,000 young people to market. Huck was the first Brazilian to have one million followers on Twitter, in only four months. Nowadays, 13.0 million people follow his tweets (@LucianoHuck), circa 18.0 million people have liked his Facebook page and 13,7 million follow him on Instagram (@lucianohuck).

Sponsors

Location and Logistics

Graduate School of Education Lemann Center 520 Galvez Mall, CERAS Building Stanford, CA 94305